Showing posts with label Windows Server 2016. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Windows Server 2016. Show all posts

Windows Server Installation and Upgrade Step by Step Installation


Applies To: Windows Server 2016, Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows Server 2012


Is it time to move to a newer version of Windows Server? Depending on what you are running now, you have lots of options to get there.

Installation

If you want to move to a newer version of Windows Server on the same hardware, one way that always works is a clean installation, where you just install the newer operating system directly over the old one on the same hardware, thus deleting the previous operating system. That is the simplest way, but you will need to back up your data first and plan to reinstall your applications. There are a few things to be aware of, such as system requirements, so be sure to check the details for Windows Server 2016, Windows Server 2012 R2, and Windows Server 2012.
Moving from any pre-release version (such as Windows Server 2016 Technical Preview) to the released version (Windows Server 2016) always requires a clean installation.
Windows Server [migration] documentation helps you migrate one role or feature at a time from a source computer that is running Windows Server to another destination computer that is running Windows Server, either the same or a newer version. For these purposes, migration is defined as moving one role or feature and its data to a different computer, not upgrading the feature on the same computer. This is the recommended manner in which to move your existing workload and data to a more recent version of Windows Server. To get started, check the server role upgrade and migration matrix for Windows Server 2016.

Cluster OS Rolling Upgrade

Cluster OS Rolling Upgrade is a new feature in Windows Server 2016 that enables an administrator to upgrade the operating system of the cluster nodes from Windows Server 2012 R2 to Windows Server 2016 without stopping the Hyper-V or the Scale-Out File Server workloads. This feature allows you to avoid downtime which could impact Service Level Agreements. This new feature is discussed in more detail at Cluster operating system rolling upgrade.

License Conversion

In some operating system releases, you can convert a particular edition of the release to another edition of the same release in a single step with a simple command and the appropriate license key. This is called license conversion. For example, if your server is running Windows Server 2016 Standard, you can convert it to Windows Server 2016 Datacenter. In some releases of Windows Server, you can also freely convert among OEM, volume-licensed, and retail versions with the same command and the appropriate key.

Upgrade

If you want to keep the same hardware and all the server roles you have set up without flattening the server, upgrading is an option—and there are lots of ways to do it. In the classic upgrade, you go from an older operating system to a newer one, keeping your settings, server roles, and data intact. For example, if your server is running Windows Server 2012 R2, you can upgrade it to Windows Server 2016. However, not every older operating system has a pathway to every newer one.
Note
Upgrade works best in virtual machines where specific OEM hardware drivers are not needed for a successful upgrade.
You can upgrade from an evaluation version of the operating system to a retail version, from an older retail version to a newer version, or, in some cases, from a volume-licensed edition of the operating system to an ordinary retail edition.
Before you get started with an upgrade, have a look at the tables on this page to see how to get from where you are to where you want to be.
For information about the differences between the installation options available for Windows Server 2016 Technical Preview, including the features that are installed with each option and the management options available after installation, see Windows Server 2016.
Note
Whenever you migrate or upgrade to any version of Windows Server, you should review and understand the support lifecycle policy and timeframe for that version and plan accordingly. You can search for the lifecycle information for the particular Windows Server release that you are interested in.

Upgrading to Windows Server 2016

For details, including important caveats and limitations on upgrade, license conversion between editions of Windows Server 2016, and conversion of evaluation editions to retail, see Supported Upgrade Paths for Windows Server 2016.
Note
Note: Upgrades that switch from a Server Core installation to a Server with a Desktop installation (or vice versa) are not supported. If the older operating system you are upgrading or converting is a Server Core installation, the result will still be a Server Core installation of the newer operating system.
Quick reference table of supported upgrade paths from older Windows Server retail editions to Windows Server 2016 retail editions:
If you are running these versions and editions: You can upgrade to these versions and editions:
Windows Server 2012 Standard Windows Server 2016 Standard or Datacenter
Windows Server 2012 Datacenter Windows Server 2016 Datacenter
Windows Server 2012 R2 Standard Windows Server 2016 Standard or Datacenter
Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter Windows Server 2016 Datacenter
Hyper-V Server 2012 R2 Hyper-V Server 2016 (using Cluster OS Rolling Upgrade feature)
Windows Server 2012 R2 Essentials Windows Server 2016 Essentials
Windows Storage Server 2012 Standard Windows Storage Server 2016 Standard
Windows Storage Server 2012 Workgroup Windows Storage Server 2016 Workgroup
Windows Storage Server 2012 R2 Standard Windows Storage Server 2016 Standard
Windows Storage Server 2012 R2 Workgroup Windows Storage Server 2016 Workgroup

License conversion

You can convert Windows Server 2016 Standard (retail) to Windows Server 2016 Datacenter (retail).
You can convert Windows Server 2016 Essentials (retail) to Windows Server 2016 Standard (retail).
You can convert the evaluation version of Windows Server 2016 Standard to either Windows Server 2016 Standard (retail) or Datacenter (retail).
You can convert the evaluation version of Windows Server 2016 Datacenter to Windows Server 2016 Datacenter (retail).

Upgrading to Windows Server 2012 R2

For details, including important caveats and limitations on upgrade, license conversion between editions of Windows Server 2012 R2, and conversion of evaluation editions to retail, see Upgrade Options for Windows Server 2012 R2.
Quick reference table of supported upgrade paths from older Windows Server retail editions to Windows Server 2012 R2 retail editions:
If you are running: You can upgrade to these editions:
Windows Server 2008 R2 Datacenter with SP1 Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter
Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise with SP1 Windows Server 2012 R2 Standard or Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter
Windows Server 2008 R2 Standard with SP1 Windows Server 2012 R2 Standard or Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter
Windows Web Server 2008 R2 with SP1 Windows Server 2012 R2 Standard
Windows Server 2012 Datacenter Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter
Windows Server 2012 Standard Windows Server 2012 R2 Standard or Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter
Hyper-V Server 2012 Hyper-V Server 2012 R2

License conversion

You can convert Windows Server 2012 Standard (retail) to Windows Server 2012 Datacenter (retail).
You can convert Windows Server 2012 Essentials (retail) to Windows Server 2012 Standard (retail).
You can convert the evaluation version of Windows Server 2012 Standard to either Windows Server 2012 Standard (retail) or Datacenter (retail).

Upgrading to Windows Server 2012

For details, including important caveats and limitations on upgrade, and conversion of evaluation editions to retail, see Evaluation Versions and Upgrade Options for Windows Server 2012.
Quick reference table of supported upgrade paths from older Windows Server retail editions to Windows Server 2012 retail editions:
If you are running: You can upgrade to these editions:
Windows Server 2008 Standard with SP2 or Windows Server 2008 Enterprise with SP2 Windows Server 2012 Standard, Windows Server 2012 Datacenter
Windows Server 2008 Datacenter with SP2
Windows Web Server 2008 Windows Server 2012 Standard
Windows Server 2008 R2 Standard with SP1 or Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise with SP1 Windows Server 2012 Standard, Windows Server 2012 Datacenter
Windows Server 2008 R2 Datacenter with SP1 Windows Server 2012 Datacenter
Windows Web Server 2008 R2 Windows Server 2012 Standard

License conversion

You can convert Windows Server 2012 Standard (retail) to Windows Server 2012 Datacenter (retail).
You can convert Windows Server 2012 Essentials (retail) to Windows Server 2012 Standard (retail).
You can convert the evaluation version of Windows Server 2012 Standard to either Windows Server 2012 Standard (retail) or Datacenter (retail).

Upgrading to Windows Server 2008 R2

For details, including important caveats and limitations, see Windows Server 2008 R2 Upgrade Paths.
Quick reference table of supported upgrade paths from older Windows Server retail editions to Windows Server 2008 R2 retail editions:
From Windows Server 2003 (SP2, R2) Upgrade to Windows Server 2008 R2
Datacenter Datacenter
Enterprise Enterprise, Datacenter
Standard Standard, Enterprise
From Windows Server 2008 (RTM-SP1, SP2) Upgrade to Windows Server 2008 R2
Datacenter Datacenter
Enterprise Enterprise, Datacenter
Foundation (SP2 only) Standard
Standard Standard, Enterprise
Web Standard, Web
From Windows Server 2008 (RC, IDS, RTM) Upgrade to Windows Server 2008 R2
Datacenter Datacenter
Enterprise Enterprise or Datacenter
Foundation Standard or Foundation
Standard Standard or Enterprise
Web Standard or Web

Windows Server Installation and Upgrade - Step by Step

Is it time to move to a newer version of Windows Server? Depending on what you are running now, you have lots of options to get there.

Installation

If you want to move to a newer version of Windows Server on the same hardware, one way that always works is a clean installation, where you just install the newer operating system directly over the old one on the same hardware, thus deleting the previous operating system. That is the simplest way, but you will need to back up your data first and plan to reinstall your applications. There are a few things to be aware of, such as system requirements, so be sure to check the details for Windows Server 2016, Windows Server 2012 R2, and Windows Server 2012.
Moving from any pre-release version (such as Windows Server 2016 Technical Preview) to the released version (Windows Server 2016) always requires a clean installation.
Windows Server [migration] documentation helps you migrate one role or feature at a time from a source computer that is running Windows Server to another destination computer that is running Windows Server, either the same or a newer version. For these purposes, migration is defined as moving one role or feature and its data to a different computer, not upgrading the feature on the same computer. This is the recommended manner in which to move your existing workload and data to a more recent version of Windows Server. To get started, check the server role upgrade and migration matrix for Windows Server 2016.

Cluster OS Rolling Upgrade

Cluster OS Rolling Upgrade is a new feature in Windows Server 2016 that enables an administrator to upgrade the operating system of the cluster nodes from Windows Server 2012 R2 to Windows Server 2016 without stopping the Hyper-V or the Scale-Out File Server workloads. This feature allows you to avoid downtime which could impact Service Level Agreements. This new feature is discussed in more detail at Cluster operating system rolling upgrade.

License Conversion

In some operating system releases, you can convert a particular edition of the release to another edition of the same release in a single step with a simple command and the appropriate license key. This is called license conversion. For example, if your server is running Windows Server 2016 Standard, you can convert it to Windows Server 2016 Datacenter. In some releases of Windows Server, you can also freely convert among OEM, volume-licensed, and retail versions with the same command and the appropriate key.

Upgrade

If you want to keep the same hardware and all the server roles you have set up without flattening the server, upgrading is an option—and there are lots of ways to do it. In the classic upgrade, you go from an older operating system to a newer one, keeping your settings, server roles, and data intact. For example, if your server is running Windows Server 2012 R2, you can upgrade it to Windows Server 2016. However, not every older operating system has a pathway to every newer one.
Note
Upgrade works best in virtual machines where specific OEM hardware drivers are not needed for a successful upgrade.
You can upgrade from an evaluation version of the operating system to a retail version, from an older retail version to a newer version, or, in some cases, from a volume-licensed edition of the operating system to an ordinary retail edition.
Before you get started with an upgrade, have a look at the tables on this page to see how to get from where you are to where you want to be.
For information about the differences between the installation options available for Windows Server 2016 Technical Preview, including the features that are installed with each option and the management options available after installation, see Windows Server 2016.
Note
Whenever you migrate or upgrade to any version of Windows Server, you should review and understand the support lifecycle policy and timeframe for that version and plan accordingly. You can search for the lifecycle information for the particular Windows Server release that you are interested in.

Upgrading to Windows Server 2016

For details, including important caveats and limitations on upgrade, license conversion between editions of Windows Server 2016, and conversion of evaluation editions to retail, see Supported Upgrade Paths for Windows Server 2016.
Note
Note: Upgrades that switch from a Server Core installation to a Server with a Desktop installation (or vice versa) are not supported. If the older operating system you are upgrading or converting is a Server Core installation, the result will still be a Server Core installation of the newer operating system.
Quick reference table of supported upgrade paths from older Windows Server retail editions to Windows Server 2016 retail editions:
If you are running these versions and editions: You can upgrade to these versions and editions:
Windows Server 2012 Standard Windows Server 2016 Standard or Datacenter
Windows Server 2012 Datacenter Windows Server 2016 Datacenter
Windows Server 2012 R2 Standard Windows Server 2016 Standard or Datacenter
Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter Windows Server 2016 Datacenter
Hyper-V Server 2012 R2 Hyper-V Server 2016 (using Cluster OS Rolling Upgrade feature)
Windows Server 2012 R2 Essentials Windows Server 2016 Essentials
Windows Storage Server 2012 Standard Windows Storage Server 2016 Standard
Windows Storage Server 2012 Workgroup Windows Storage Server 2016 Workgroup
Windows Storage Server 2012 R2 Standard Windows Storage Server 2016 Standard
Windows Storage Server 2012 R2 Workgroup Windows Storage Server 2016 Workgroup

License conversion

You can convert Windows Server 2016 Standard (retail) to Windows Server 2016 Datacenter (retail).
You can convert Windows Server 2016 Essentials (retail) to Windows Server 2016 Standard (retail).
You can convert the evaluation version of Windows Server 2016 Standard to either Windows Server 2016 Standard (retail) or Datacenter (retail).
You can convert the evaluation version of Windows Server 2016 Datacenter to Windows Server 2016 Datacenter (retail).

Upgrading to Windows Server 2012 R2

For details, including important caveats and limitations on upgrade, license conversion between editions of Windows Server 2012 R2, and conversion of evaluation editions to retail, see Upgrade Options for Windows Server 2012 R2.
Quick reference table of supported upgrade paths from older Windows Server retail editions to Windows Server 2012 R2 retail editions:
If you are running: You can upgrade to these editions:
Windows Server 2008 R2 Datacenter with SP1 Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter
Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise with SP1 Windows Server 2012 R2 Standard or Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter
Windows Server 2008 R2 Standard with SP1 Windows Server 2012 R2 Standard or Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter
Windows Web Server 2008 R2 with SP1 Windows Server 2012 R2 Standard
Windows Server 2012 Datacenter Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter
Windows Server 2012 Standard Windows Server 2012 R2 Standard or Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter
Hyper-V Server 2012 Hyper-V Server 2012 R2

License conversion

You can convert Windows Server 2012 Standard (retail) to Windows Server 2012 Datacenter (retail).
You can convert Windows Server 2012 Essentials (retail) to Windows Server 2012 Standard (retail).
You can convert the evaluation version of Windows Server 2012 Standard to either Windows Server 2012 Standard (retail) or Datacenter (retail).

Upgrading to Windows Server 2012

For details, including important caveats and limitations on upgrade, and conversion of evaluation editions to retail, see Evaluation Versions and Upgrade Options for Windows Server 2012.
Quick reference table of supported upgrade paths from older Windows Server retail editions to Windows Server 2012 retail editions:
If you are running: You can upgrade to these editions:
Windows Server 2008 Standard with SP2 or Windows Server 2008 Enterprise with SP2 Windows Server 2012 Standard, Windows Server 2012 Datacenter
Windows Server 2008 Datacenter with SP2
Windows Web Server 2008 Windows Server 2012 Standard
Windows Server 2008 R2 Standard with SP1 or Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise with SP1 Windows Server 2012 Standard, Windows Server 2012 Datacenter
Windows Server 2008 R2 Datacenter with SP1 Windows Server 2012 Datacenter
Windows Web Server 2008 R2 Windows Server 2012 Standard

License conversion

You can convert Windows Server 2012 Standard (retail) to Windows Server 2012 Datacenter (retail).
You can convert Windows Server 2012 Essentials (retail) to Windows Server 2012 Standard (retail).
You can convert the evaluation version of Windows Server 2012 Standard to either Windows Server 2012 Standard (retail) or Datacenter (retail).

Upgrading to Windows Server 2008 R2

For details, including important caveats and limitations, see Windows Server 2008 R2 Upgrade Paths.
Quick reference table of supported upgrade paths from older Windows Server retail editions to Windows Server 2008 R2 retail editions:
From Windows Server 2003 (SP2, R2) Upgrade to Windows Server 2008 R2
Datacenter Datacenter
Enterprise Enterprise, Datacenter
Standard Standard, Enterprise
From Windows Server 2008 (RTM-SP1, SP2) Upgrade to Windows Server 2008 R2
Datacenter Datacenter
Enterprise Enterprise, Datacenter
Foundation (SP2 only) Standard
Standard Standard, Enterprise
Web Standard, Web
From Windows Server 2008 (RC, IDS, RTM) Upgrade to Windows Server 2008 R2
Datacenter Datacenter
Enterprise Enterprise or Datacenter
Foundation Standard or Foundation
Standard Standard or Enterprise
Web Standard or Web

Migrating Roles and Features in Windows Server - Step by Step

This page contains links to information and tools that help guide you through the process of migrating roles and features to Windows Server 2016, Windows Server 2012 R2, and Windows Server 2012. Many roles and features can be migrated by using Windows Server Migration Tools, a set of five Windows PowerShell cmdlets that was introduced in Windows Server 2008 R2 for easily migrating role and feature elements and data.
The migration guides support migrations of specified roles and features from one server to another (not in-place upgrades). Unless otherwise noted in the guides, migrations are supported between physical and virtual computers, and between full installation options of Windows Server and servers that are running the Server Core installation option.

Before you begin

Before you begin migrating roles and features, verify that both source and destination servers are running the most current service packs that are available for their operating systems. An e-book of Windows Server 2012 R2 and Windows Server 2012 migration guides is now available. For more information, and to download the e-book, see the E-Book Gallery for Microsoft Technologies. Windows Server Migration Guides are also available as part of the PDF download, Windows Server 2012 R2 and Windows Server 2012 TechNet Library Documentation, available on the Microsoft Download Center.
Note
Whenever you migrate or upgrade to any version of Windows Server, you should review and understand the support lifecycle policy and timeframe for that version and plan accordingly. You can search for the lifecycle information for the particular Windows Server release that you are interested in.

Windows Server 2016

Migration Guides

Updated migration guides for Windows Server 2016 are under development. Check back at this location for updates as they become available. In many cases, the steps in the Windows Server 2012 R2 migration guides are still relevant for Windows Server 2016.
  • Remote Desktop Services
  • Web Server (IIS)
  • Windows Server Update Services
  • MultiPoint Services

Windows Server 2012 R2

Migration Guides

Follow the steps in these guides to migrate roles and features from servers that are running Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Server 2012, or Windows Server 2012 R2 to Windows Server 2012 R2. Windows Server Migration Tools in Windows Server 2012 R2 supports cross-subnet migrations.
  • Install, Use, and Remove Windows Server Migration Tools
  • Active Directory Certificate Services Migration Guide for Windows Server 2012 R2
  • Migrating Active Directory Federation Services Role Service to Windows Server 2012 R2
  • Active Directory Rights Management Services Migration and Upgrade Guide
  • Migrate File and Storage Services to Windows Server 2012 R2
  • Migrate Hyper-V to Windows Server 2012 R2 from Windows Server 2012
  • Migrate Network Policy Server to Windows Server 2012
  • Migrate Remote Desktop Services to Windows Server 2012 R2
  • Migrate Windows Server Update Services to Windows Server 2012 R2
  • Migrate Cluster Roles to Windows Server 2012 R2
  • Migrate DHCP Server to Windows Server 2012 R2

Windows Server 2012

Migration Guides

Follow the steps in these guides to migrate roles and features from servers that are running Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2008 R2, or Windows Server 2012 to Windows Server 2012. Windows Server Migration Tools in Windows Server 2012 supports cross-subnet migrations.
  • Install, Use, and Remove Windows Server Migration Tools
  • Migrate Active Directory Federation Services Role Services to Windows Server 2012
  • Migrate Health Registration Authority to Windows Server 2012
  • Migrate Hyper-V to Windows Server 2012 from Windows Server 2008 R2
  • Migrate IP Configuration to Windows Server 2012
  • Migrate Network Policy Server to Windows Server 2012
  • Migrate Print and Document Services to Windows Server 2012
  • Migrate Remote Access to Windows Server 2012
  • Migrate Windows Server Update Services to Windows Server 2012
  • Upgrade Active Directory Domain Controllers to Windows Server 2012
  • Migrating Clustered Services and Applications to Windows Server 2012

Windows Server 2008 R2

Migration Guides

Follow the steps in these guides to migrate roles and features from servers that are running Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2008, or Windows Server 2008 R2 to Windows Server 2008 R2. Windows Server Migration Tools in Windows Server 2008 R2 does not support cross-subnet migrations.
  • Windows Server Migration Tools Installation, Access, and Removal
  • Active Directory Certificate Services Migration Guide
  • Active Directory Domain Services and Domain Name System (DNS) Server Migration Guide
  • BranchCache Migration Guide
  • Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) Server Migration Guide
  • File Services Migration Guide
  • HRA Migration Guide
  • Hyper-V Migration Guide
  • IP Configuration Migration Guide
  • Local User and Group Migration Guide
  • NPS Migration Guide
  • Print Services Migration Guide
  • Remote Desktop Services Migration Guide
  • RRAS Migration Guide
  • Windows Server Migration Common Tasks and Information
  • Windows Server Update Services 3.0 SP2 Migration Guide

Windows Server 2016 System Requirements - Step by Step


System Requirements

This topic addresses the minimum system requirements to run Windows Server® 2016.
Note
In this release, clean installations are recommended.
Note
If at the time of installation, you choose to install with the Server Core option, you should be aware that no GUI components are installed at all and you will not be able to install or uninstall them with Server Manager. If you need GUI features, be sure to choose the "Server with Desktop Experience" option when you install Windows Server 2016. For more information, see Install Nano Server

Review system requirements

The following are estimated system requirements Windows Server 2016. If your computer has less than the "minimum" requirements, you will not be able to install this product correctly. Actual requirements will vary based on your system configuration and the applications and features you install.
Unless otherwise specified, these minimum system requirements apply to all installation options (Server Core, Server with Desktop Experience, and Nano Server) and both Standard and Datacenter editions.
Important
The highly diverse scope of potential deployments makes it unrealistic to state "recommended" system requirements that would be generally applicable. Consult documentation for each of the server roles you intend to deploy for more details about the resource needs of particular server roles. For the best results, conduct test deployments to determine appropriate system requirements for your particular deployment scenarios.

Processor

Processor performance depends not only on the clock frequency of the processor, but also on the number of processor cores and the size of the processor cache. The following are the processor requirements for this product:
Minimum:
  • 1.4 GHz 64-bit processor
  • Compatible with x64 instruction set
  • Supports NX and DEP
  • Supports CMPXCHG16b, LAHF/SAHF, and PrefetchW
  • Supports Second Level Address Translation (EPT or NPT)
Coreinfo is a tool you can use to confirm which of these capabilities you CPU has.

RAM

The following are the estimated RAM requirements for this product:
Minimum:
  • 512 MB (2 GB for Server with Desktop Experience installation option)
  • ECC (Error Correcting Code) type or similar technology
Important
If you create a virtual machine with the minimum supported hardware parameters (1 processor core and 512 MB RAM) and then attempt to install this release on the virtual machine, Setup will fail.
To avoid this, do one of the following:
  • Allocate more than 800 MB RAM to the virtual machine you intend to install this release on. Once Setup has completed, you can change the allocation to as little as 512 MB RAM, depending on the actual server configuration.
  • Interrupt the boot process of this release on the virtual machine with SHIFT+F10. In the command prompt that opens, use Diskpart.exe to create and format an installation partition. Run Wpeutil createpagefile /path=C:\pf.sys (assuming the installation partition you created was C:). Close the command prompt and proceed with Setup.

Storage controller and disk space requirements

Computers that run Windows Server 2016 must include a storage adapter that is compliant with the PCI Express architecture specification. Persistent storage devices on servers classified as hard disk drives must not be PATA. Windows Server 2016 does not allow ATA/PATA/IDE/EIDE for boot, page, or data drives.
The following are the estimated minimum disk space requirements for the system partition.
Minimum: 32 GB
Note
Be aware that 32 GB should be considered an absolute minimum value for successful installation. This minimum should allow you to install Windows Server 2016 in Server Core mode, with the Web Services (IIS) server role. A server in Server Core mode is about 4 GB smaller than the same server in Server with a GUI mode.
The system partition will need extra space for any of the following circumstances:
  • If you install the system over a network.
  • Computers with more than 16 GB of RAM will require more disk space for paging, hibernation, and dump files.

Network adapter requirements

Network adapters used with this release should include these features:
Minimum:
  • An Ethernet adapter capable of at least gigabit throughput
  • Compliant with the PCI Express architecture specification.
  • Supports Pre-boot Execution Environment (PXE).
A network adapter that supports network debugging (KDNet) is useful, but not a minimum requirement.

Other requirements

Computers running this release also must have the following:
  • DVD drive (if you intend to install the operating system from DVD media)
The following items are not strictly required, but are necessary for certain features:
  • UEFI 2.3.1c-based system and firmware that supports secure boot
  • Trusted Platform Module
  • Graphics device and monitor capable of Super VGA (1024 x 768) or higher-resolution
  • Keyboard and Microsoft® mouse (or other compatible pointing device)
  • Internet access (fees may apply)
Note
A Trusted Platform Module (TPM) chip is not strictly required to install this release, though it is necessary in order to use certain features such as BitLocker Drive Encryption. If your computer uses TPM, it must meet these requirements:
  • Hardware-based TPMs must implement version 2.0 of the TPM specification.
  • TPMs that implement version 2.0 must have an EK certificate that is >either pre-provisioned to the TPM by the hardware vendor or be capable of >being retrieved by the device during the first boot.
  • TPMs that implement version 2.0 must ship with SHA-256 PCR banks and >implement PCRs 0 through 23 for SHA-256. It is acceptable to ship TPMs >with a single switchable PCR bank that can be used for both SHA-1 and >SHA-256 measurements.
  • A UEFI option to turn off the TPM is not a requirement.

Step by Step: Important Issues in Windows Server 2016

These release notes summarize the most critical issues in the Windows Server® 2016 operating system, including ways to avoid or work around the issues, if known. For information about by-design changes, new features, and fixes in this release, see What's New in Windows Server 2016 and announcements from the specific feature teams. Unless otherwise specified, each reported issue applies to all editions and installation options of Windows Server 2016.
This document is continuously updated. As critical issues requiring a workaround are discovered, they are added, as are new workarounds and fixes as they become available.

Server Core installation option

When you install Windows Server 2016 by using the Server Core installation option, the print spooler is installed and starts by default even when the Print Server role is not installed.
To avoid this, after the first boot, set the print spooler to disabled.

Containers

  • Before you use containers, install Servicing stack update for Windows 10 Version 1607: August 23, 2016 or any later updates that are available. Otherwise, a number of problems can occur, including failures in building, starting, or running containers, and errors similar to "CreateProcess failed in Win32: The RPC server is unavailable."
  • The NanoServerPackage OneGet provider does not work in Windows Containers. To work around this, use Find-NanoServerPackage and Save-NanoServerPackage on a different computer (not a container) to download the needed package. Then copy the packages into the container and install them.

Device Guard

If you use virtualization-based protection of code integrity or Shielded virtual machines (that use virtualization-based protection of code integrity), you should be aware that these technologies could be incompatible with some devices and applications. You should test such configurations in your lab before enabling the features on production systems. Failure to do so could result in unexpected data loss or stop errors.

Microsoft Exchange

If you attempt to run Microsoft Exchange 2016 CU3 on Windows Server 2016, you will experience errors in the IIS host process W3WP.exe. There is no workaround at this time. You should postpone deployment of Exchange 2016 CU3 on Windows Server 2016 until a supported fix is available.

Remote Server Administration Tools (RSAT)

If you are running a version of Windows 10 older than the Anniversary Update, and are using Hyper-V and virtual machines with an enabled virtual Trusted Platform Module (including shielded virtual machines), and then install the version of RSAT provided for Windows Server 2016, attempts to start those virtual machines will fail.
To avoid this, upgrade the client computer to Windows 10 Anniversary Update (or later) prior to installing RSAT. If this has already occurred, uninstall RSAT, upgrade the client to Window 10 Anniversary Update, and then reinstall RSAT.

Shielded virtual machines

  • Ensure that you have installed all available updates before you deploy Shielded virtual machines in production.
  • If you use virtualization-based protection of code integrity or Shielded virtual machines (that use virtualization-based protection of code integrity), you should be aware that these technologies could be incompatible with some devices and applications. You should test such configurations in your lab before enabling the features on production systems. Failure to do so could result in unexpected data loss or stop errors.

Start menu

This issue affects Windows Server 2016 installed with the Server with Desktop Experience option.
If you install any applications which add shortcut items inside a folder on the Start menu, the shortcuts will not work until you log out and log back in again.
Go back to the main Windows Server 2016 hub.
This document is provided "as-is". Information and views expressed in this document, including URL and other Internet Web site references, may change without notice.
This document does not provide you with any legal rights to any intellectual property in any Microsoft product. You may copy and use this document for your internal, reference purposes.
© 2016 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Microsoft, Active Directory, Hyper-V, Windows, and Windows Server are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries.
This product contains graphics filter software; this software is based in part on the work of the Independent JPEG Group.
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Step by Step - Recommendations for moving to Windows Server 2016

 Recommendations for moving to Windows Server 2016



If you are running:

Windows Server 2012 R2 or Windows Server 2012 Windows Server 2008 R2 or Windows Server 2008
Windows Server role infrastructure Choose either upgrade or migration depending on specific role guidance. - To take advantage of new features in Windows Server 2016, deploy new hardware, or install Windows Server 2016 in a virtual machine on an existing host. Some new features work best on a Windows Server 2016 physical host running Hyper-V.
- Follow specific role guidance.
Microsoft server management and application workloads - Application upgrades should include migration to Windows Server 2016. See the compatibility list.
- Upgrades to Windows Server 2016 only (i.e., without upgrading applications) should use application-specific guidance.
- To take advantage of new features in Windows Server 2016, deploy new hardware, or install Windows Server 2016 in a virtual machine on an existing host. Some new features work best on a Windows Server 2016 physical host running Hyper-V. Follow migration guides as applicable.
- Or, remain on your current OS and run in a virtual machine running on a Windows Server 2016 host, or Microsoft Azure. Contact your EA reseller, TAM, or Microsoft for extended support options through Software Assurance.
ISV application workloads - Upgrades to Windows Server 2016 should use application-specific guidance.
- For more information on Windows Server compatibility with non-Microsoft applications, visit the Windows Server Logo Certification portal.
- To take advantage of new features in Windows Server 2016, deploy new hardware, or install Windows Server 2016 in a virtual machine on an existing host. Some new features work best on a Windows Server 2016 physical host running Hyper-V. Follow migration guides as applicable.
- Or, remain on your current OS and run in a virtual machine running on a Windows Server 2016 host, or Microsoft Azure. Contact your EA reseller, TAM, or Microsoft for extended support options through Software Assurance.
Custom application workloads - Consult with application developers on compatibility with Windows Server 2016 and upgrade guidance.
- Leverage Microsoft Azure to test application on Windows Server 2016 prior to switch.
- See complete options in the next section.
- Consult with your application developers on compatibility with Windows Server 2016 and upgrade guidance.
- Leverage Microsoft Azure to test your application on Windows Server 2016 prior to switch.
- To take advantage of new features in Windows Server 2016, deploy new hardware, or install Windows Server 2016 in a virtual machine on an existing host. Some new features work best on a Windows Server 2016 physical host running Hyper-V.
- See complete options in the next section.

Complete options for moving servers running custom or "in-house" applications on older versions of Windows Server to Windows Server 2016

There are more options than ever before to help you and your customers take advantage of features in Windows Server 2016, with minimal impact to your current services and workloads.
  • Try out the latest operating system with your application by downloading the evaluation version of Windows Server for testing on your premises. Once testing is complete and quality confirmed, you can perform a simple license conversion with a retail license key (requires restarting).
  • Microsoft Azure can also be used on a trial basis for testing to ensure your custom application will work on the latest server operating system. Once testing is complete and quality confirmed, migrate to the latest Windows Server version on your premises.
  • Or alternatively, once testing is complete and quality confirmed, Microsoft Azure can be used as the permanent location for your custom application or service. This allows the old server to remain available until you are ready to switch over to the new server in Azure.
    • If you already have Software Assurance for Windows Server, save money by deploying with the Azure Hybrid Use Benefit.
  • In most cases, Microsoft Azure can be used to host the same application on the older version of Windows Server that it is running on today. Migrate the application and workload to a virtual machine with the operating system of your choice by using Azure Marketplace images.
    • If you already have Software Assurance for Windows Server, save money by deploying with the Azure Hybrid Use Benefit.
  • The Software Assurance program for Windows Server provides new version rights benefits. Along with a list of other benefits, servers with Software Assurance can be upgraded to the latest version of Window Server when the time is right, without having to purchase a new license.

Additional resources

  • Features removed or deprecated in Windows Server 2016
  • For general server upgrade and migration options, visit Upgrade and conversion options for Windows Server 2016.
  • For more information on product lifecycle and support levels, see the Support Lifecycle Policy FAQ.

Step by Step - Upgrade and conversion options for Windows Server 2016

This topic includes information about upgrading to Windows Server® 2016 from a variety of previous operating systems using a variety of methods.
The process of moving to Windows Server 2016 might vary greatly depending on which operating system you are starting with and the pathway you take. We use the following terms to distinguish among different actions, any of which could be involved in a new Windows Server 2016 deployment.
  • Installation is the basic concept of getting the new operating system on your hardware. Specifically, a clean installation requires deleting the previous operating system. For information about installing Windows Server 2016, see System Requirements and Installation Information for Windows Server 2016. For information about installing other versions of Windows Server, see Windows Server Installation and Upgrade.
  • Migration means moving from your existing operating system to Windows Server 2016 by transferring to a different set of hardware or virtual machine. Migration, which might vary considerably depending on the server roles you have installed, is discussed in detail at Windows Server Installation, Upgrade, and Migration.
  • Cluster OS Rolling Upgrade is a new feature in Windows Server 2016 that enables an administrator to upgrade the operating system of the cluster nodes from Windows Server 2012 R2 to Windows Server 2016 without stopping the Hyper-V or the Scale-Out File Server workloads. This feature allows you to avoid downtime which could impact Service Level Agreements. This new feature is discussed in more detail at Cluster operating system rolling upgrade.
  • License conversion In some operating system releases, you can convert a particular edition of the release to another edition of the same release in a single step with a simple command and the appropriate license key. We call this “license conversion.” For example, if you are running Windows Server 2016 Standard, you can convert it to Windows Server 2016 Datacenter.
  • Upgrade means moving from your existing operating system release to a more recent release while staying on the same hardware. (This is sometimes called "in-place" upgrade.) For example, if your server is running Windows Server 2012, or Windows Server 2012 R2, you can upgrade it to Windows Server 2016. You can upgrade from an evaluation version of the operating system to a retail version, from an older retail version to a newer version, or, in some cases, from a volume-licensed edition of the operating system to an ordinary retail edition.
Important
Upgrade works best in virtual machines where specific OEM hardware drivers are not needed for a successful upgrade.
Important
For releases of Windows Server 2016 prior to 14393.0.161119-1705.RS1_REFRESH, you can only perform conversion from evaluation to retail with Windows Server 2016 that has been installed by using the Desktop Experience option (not the Server Core option). Starting with version 14393.0.161119-1705.RS1_REFRESH and later releases, you can convert evaluation editions to retail regardless of the installation option used.
Important
If your server uses NIC Teaming, disable NIC Teaming prior to upgrade, and then re-enable it after upgrade is complete. See NIC Teaming Overview for details.

Upgrading previous retail versions of Windows Server to Windows Server 2016

The table below briefly summarizes which already licensed (that is, not evaluation) Windows operating systems can be upgraded to which editions of Windows Server 2016.
Note the following general guidelines for supported paths:
  • Upgrades from 32-bit to 64-bit architectures are not supported. All editions of Windows Server 2016 are 64-bit only.
  • Upgrades from one language to another are not supported.
  • If the server is a domain controller, see Upgrade Domain Controllers to Windows Server 2012 R2 and Windows Server 2012 for important information.
  • Upgrades from pre-release versions (previews) of Windows Server 2016 are not supported. Perform a clean installation to Windows Server 2016.
  • Upgrades that switch from a Server Core installation to a Server with a Desktop installation (or vice versa) are not supported.
  • Upgrades from a previous Windows Server installation to an evaluation copy of Windows Server are not supported. Evaluation versions should be installed as a clean installation.
If you do not see your current version in the left column, upgrading to this release of Windows Server 2016 is not supported.
If you see more than one edition in the right column, upgrading to either edition from the same starting version is supported.
If you are running this edition: You can upgrade to these editions:
Windows Server 2012 Standard Windows Server 2016 Standard or Datacenter
Windows Server 2012 Datacenter Windows Server 2016 Datacenter
Windows Server 2012 R2 Standard Windows Server 2016 Standard or Datacenter
Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter Windows Server 2016 Datacenter
Windows Server 2012 R2 Essentials Windows Server 2016 Essentials
Windows Storage Server 2012 Standard Windows Storage Server 2016 Standard
Windows Storage Server 2012 Workgroup Windows Storage Server 2016 Workgroup
Windows Storage Server 2012 R2 Standard Windows Storage Server 2016 Standard
Windows Storage Server 2012 R2 Workgroup Windows Storage Server 2016 Workgroup

Per-server-role considerations for upgrading

Even in supported upgrade paths from previous retail versions to Windows Server 2016, certain server roles that are already installed might require additional preparation or actions for the role to continue functioning after the upgrade. Consult the specific TechNet Library topics for each server role you intend to upgrade for details of additional steps that might be required.

Converting a current evaluation version to a current retail version

You can convert the evaluation version of Windows Server 2016 Standard to either Windows Server 2016 Standard (retail) or Datacenter (retail). Similarly, you can convert the evaluation version of Windows Server 2016 Datacenter to the retail version.
Important
For releases of Windows Server 2016 prior to 14393.0.161119-1705.RS1_REFRESH, you can only perform this conversion from evaluation to retail with Windows Server 2016 that has been installed by using the Desktop Experience option (not the Server Core option). Starting with version 14393.0.161119-1705.RS1_REFRESH and later releases, you can convert evaluation editions to retail regardless of the installation option used.
Before you attempt to convert from evaluation to retail, verify that your server is actually running an evaluation version. To do this, do either of the following:
  • From an elevated command prompt, run slmgr.vbs /dlv; evaluation versions will include “EVAL” in the output.
  • From the Start screen, open Control Panel. Open System and Security, and then System. View Windows activation status in the Windows activation area of the System page. Click View details in Windows activation for more information about your Windows activation status.
If you have already activated Windows, the Desktop shows the time remaining in the evaluation period.
If the server is running a retail version instead of an evaluation version, see the “Upgrading previous retail versions of Windows Server to Windows Server 2016” section of this topic for instructions to upgrade to Windows Server 2016.
For Windows Server 2016 Essentials: You can convert to the full retail version by entering a retail, volume license, or OEM key in the command slmgr.vbs.
If the server is running an evaluation version of Windows Server 2016 Standard or Windows Server 2016 Datacenter, you can convert it to a retail version as follows:
  1. If the server is a domain controller, you cannot convert it to a retail version. In this case, install an additional domain controller on a server that runs a retail version and remove AD DS from the domain controller that runs on the evaluation version. For more information, see Upgrade Domain Controllers to Windows Server 2012 R2 and Windows Server 2012.
  2. Read the license terms.
  3. From an elevated command prompt, determine the current edition name with the command DISM /online /Get-CurrentEdition. Make note of the edition ID, an abbreviated form of the edition name. Then run DISM /online /Set-Edition:<edition ID> /ProductKey:XXXXX-XXXXX-XXXXX-XXXXX-XXXXX /AcceptEula, providing the edition ID and a retail product key. The server will restart twice.
For the evaluation version of Windows Server 2016 Standard, you can also convert to the retail version of Windows Server 2016 Datacenter in one step using this same command and the appropriate product key.
Tip For more information about Dism.exe, see DISM Command-line options.

Converting a current retail edition to a different current retail edition

At any time after installing Windows Server 2016, you can run Setup to repair the installation (sometimes called “repair in place”) or, in certain cases, to convert to a different edition. You can run Setup to perform a “repair in place” on any edition of Windows Server 2016; the result will be the same edition you started with.
For Windows Server 2016 Standard, you can convert the system to Windows Server 2016 Datacenter as follows: From an elevated command prompt, determine the current edition name with the command DISM /online /Get-CurrentEdition. Make note of the edition ID, an abbreviated form of the edition name. Then run DISM /online /Set-Edition:<edition ID> /ProductKey:XXXXX-XXXXX-XXXXX-XXXXX-XXXXX /AcceptEula, providing the edition ID and a retail product key. The server will restart twice.

Converting a current retail version to a current volume-licensed version

At any time after installing Windows Server 2016, you can freely convert it between a retail version, a volume-licensed version, or an OEM version. The edition remains the same during this conversion. If you are starting with an evaluation version, convert it to the retail version first, and then you can inter-convert as described here.
To do this, from an elevated command prompt, run: slmgr /ipk <key>
Where <key> is the appropriate volume-license, retail, or OEM product key.

Step by Step Server role upgrade and migration matrix for Windows Server 2016

The grid on this page explains your server role upgrade and migration options specifically for moving to Windows Server 2016. For individual role migration guides, visit Migrating Roles and Features in Windows Server. For more information about installation and upgrades, see Windows Server Installation, Upgrade, and Migration.
Server Role Upgradeable from Windows Server 2012 R2? Upgradeable from Windows Server 2012? Migration Supported? Can migration be completed without downtime?
Active Directory Certificate Services Yes Yes Yes No
Active Directory Domain Services Yes Yes Yes Yes
Active Directory Federation Services No No Yes No (new nodes need to be added to the farm)
Active Directory Lightweight Directory Services Yes Yes Yes Yes
Active Directory Rights Management Services Yes Yes Yes No
DHCP Server Yes Yes Yes Yes
DNS Server Yes Yes Yes No
Failover Cluster Yes with Cluster OS Rolling Upgrade process which includes node Pause-Drain, Evict, upgrade to Windows Server 2016 and rejoin the original cluster. Yes, when the server is removed by the cluster for upgrade and then added to a different cluster. Not while the server is part of a cluster. Yes, when the server is removed by the cluster for upgrade and then added to a different cluster. Yes No for Windows Server 2012 Failover Clusters. Yes for Windows Server 2012 R2 Failover Clusters with Hyper-V VMs or Windows Server 2012 R2 Failover Clusters running the Scale-out File Server role. See Cluster OS Rolling Upgrade.
File and Storage Services Yes Yes Varies by sub-feature No
Hyper-V Yes. (When the host is part of a cluster with Cluster OS Rolling Upgrade process which includes node Pause-Drain, Evict, upgrade to Windows Server 2016 and rejoin the original cluster.) No Yes No for Windows Server 2012 Failover Clusters. Yes for Windows Server 2012 R2 Failover Clusters with Hyper-V VMs or Windows Server 2012 R2 Failover Clusters running the Scale-out File Server role. See Cluster OS Rolling Upgrade.
Print and Fax Services No No Yes (Printbrm.exe) No
Remote Desktop Services Yes, for all sub-roles, but mixed mode farm is not supported Yes, for all sub-roles, but mixed mode farm is not supported Yes No
Web Server (IIS) Yes Yes Yes No
Windows Server Essentials Experience Yes N/A – new feature Yes No
Windows Server Update Services Yes Yes Yes No
Work Folders Yes Yes Yes Yes from WS 2012 R2 cluster when using Cluster OS Rolling Upgrade.

Windows Server 2016 and Microsoft Server Application Compatibility - Step by Step

This table lists Microsoft server applications that support installation and functionality on Window Server 2016. This information is for quick reference and is not intended to replace the individual product specifications, requirements, announcements, or general communications of each individual server application. Refer to official documentation for each product to fully understand compatibility and options.
For customers and software vendor partners looking for more information on Windows Server compatibility with non-Microsoft applications, visit the main Windows Server Logo Certification portal.

Microsoft Server Application Released? Product Link
Microsoft SQL Server 2012 Yes Hardware and Software Requirements for Installing SQL Server 2012
Microsoft SQL Server 2014 Yes Hardware and Software Requirements for Installing SQL Server 2014
Microsoft SQL Server 2016 Yes SQL Server 2016
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2016 Yes What's New in System Center
Microsoft System Center Operations Manager 2016 Yes What's New in System Center
Microsoft System Center Data Protection Manager 2016 Yes What's New in System Center
Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager (version 1606) Yes What's new in version 1606 of System Center Configuration Manager
SharePoint Server 2016 Yes Hardware and software requirements for SharePoint Server 2016
Project Server 2016 Yes Software requirements for Project Server 2016
Exchange Server 2016 Yes Updates for Exchange 2016
Biztalk Server 2016 Yes Microsoft BizTalk Server
Host Integration Server 2016 Yes What's New in HIS 2016
Visual Studio Team Foundation Server 2017 Yes Team Foundation Server 2017
Skype for Business Server 2015 No Server requirements for Skype for Business Server 2015
Office Online Server Yes Plan Office Online Server

Step by Step - Features Removed or Deprecated in Windows Server 2016

The following is a list of features and functionalities in Windows Server 2016 that have either been removed from the product in the current release or are planned for potential removal in subsequent releases (deprecated). It is intended for IT professionals who are updating operating systems in a commercial environment. This list is subject to change in subsequent releases and may not include every deprecated feature or functionality. For more details about a particular feature or functionality and its replacement, see the documentation for that feature.

Features removed from Windows Server 2016

The following features and functionalities have been removed from this release of Windows Server 2016. Applications, code, or usage that depend on these features will not function in this release unless you employ an alternate method.
Note
If you are moving to Windows Server 2016 from a server release prior to Windows Server 2012 R2 or Windows Server 2012, you should also review Features Removed or Deprecated in Windows Server 2012 R2 and Features Removed or Deprecated in Windows Server 2012.

File server

The Share and Storage Management snap-in for Microsoft Management Console has been removed. Instead, do any of the following:
  • If the computer you want to manage is running an operating system older than Windows Server 2016, connect to it with Remote Desktop and use the local version of the Share and Storage Management snap-in.
  • On a computer running Windows 8.1 or earlier, use the Share and Storage Management snap-in from RSAT to view the computer you want to manage.
  • Use Hyper-V on a client computer to run a virtual machine running Windows 7, Windows 8, or Windows 8.1 that has the Share and Storage Management snap-in in RSAT.

Journal.dll

The Journal.dll is removed from Windows Server 2016. There is no replacement.

Security Configuration Wizard

The Security Configuration Wizard is removed. Instead, features are secured by default. If you need to control specific security settings, you can use either Group Policy or Microsoft Security Compliance Manager.

SQM

The opt-in components that manage participation in the Customer Experience Improvement Program have been removed.

Windows Update

The wuauclt.exe /detectnow command has been removed and is no longer supported. To trigger a scan for updates, do either of the following:
  • Run these PowerShell commands:
$AutoUpdates = New-Object -ComObject "Microsoft.Update.AutoUpdate"
$AutoUpdates.DetectNow()
  • Alternately, use this VBScript:
Set automaticUpdates = CreateObject("Microsoft.Update.AutoUpdate")
automaticUpdates.DetectNow()

Features deprecated starting with Windows Server 2016

The following features and functionalities are deprecated starting with this release. Eventually, they will be completely removed from the product, but they are still available in this release, sometimes with certain functionality removed. You should begin planning now to employ alternate methods for any applications, code, or usage that depend on these features.

Configuration tools

  • Scregedit.exe is deprecated. If you have scripts that depend on Scregedit.exe, adjust them to use Reg.exe or Windows PowerShell methods.
  • Sconfig.exe is deprecated. Use Windows PowerShell instead.

NetCfg custom APIs

Installation of PrintProvider, NetClient, and ISDN using NetCfg custom APIs is deprecated.

Remote management

WinRM.vbs is deprecated. Instead, use functionality in the WinRM provider of Windows PowerShell.

SMB

SMB 2+ over NetBT is deprecated. Instead, implement SMB over TCP or RDMA.
2.0

Comparison of Standard and Datacenter editions of Windows Server 2016 - Step by Step

Locks and Limits

Locks and Limits Windows Server 2016 Standard Windows Server 2016 Datacenter
Maximum number of users Based on CALs Based on CALs
Maximum SMB connections 16777216 16777216
Maximum RRAS connections unlimited unlimited
Maximum IAS connections 2147483647 2147483647
Maximum RDS connections 65535 65535
Maximum number of 64-bit sockets 64 64
Maximum number of cores unlimited unlimited
Maximum RAM 24 TB 24 TB
Can be used as virtualization guest Yes; 2 virtual machines, plus one Hyper-V host per license Yes; unlimited virtual machines, plus one Hyper-V host per license
Server can join a domain yes yes
Edge network protection/firewall no no
DirectAccess yes yes
DLNA codecs and web media streaming Yes, if installed as Server with Desktop Experience Yes, if installed as Server with Desktop Experience

Server roles

Windows Server roles available Role services Windows Server 2016 Standard Windows Server 2016 Datacenter
Active Directory Certificate Services
Yes Yes
Active Directory Domain Services
Yes Yes
Active Directory Federation Services
Yes Yes
AD Lightweight Directory Services
Yes Yes
AD Rights Management Services
Yes Yes
Device Health Attestation
Yes Yes
DHCP Server
Yes Yes
DNS Server
Yes Yes
Fax Server
Yes Yes
File and Storage Services File Server Yes Yes
File and Storage Services BranchCache for Network Files Yes Yes
File and Storage Services Data Deduplication Yes Yes
File and Storage Services DFS Namespaces Yes Yes
File and Storage Services DFS Replication Yes Yes
File and Storage Services File Server Resource Manager Yes Yes
File and Storage Services File Server VSS Agent Service Yes Yes
File and Storage Services iSCSI Target Server Yes Yes
File and Storage Services iSCSI Target Storage Provider Yes Yes
File and Storage Services Server for NFS Yes Yes
File and Storage Services Work Folders Yes Yes
File and Storage Services Storage Services Yes Yes
Host Guardian Service
Yes Yes
Hyper-V
Yes Yes; including Shielded Virtual Machines
MultiPoint Services
Yes Yes
Network Controller
No Yes
Network Policy and Access Services
Yes, when installed as Server with Desktop Experience Yes, when installed as Server with Desktop Experience
Print and Document Services
Yes Yes
Remote Access
Yes Yes
Remote Desktop Services
Yes Yes
Volume Activation Services
Yes Yes
Web Services (IIS)
Yes Yes
Windows Deployment Services
Yes, when installed as Server with Desktop Experience Yes, when installed as Server with Desktop Experience
Windows Server Essentials Experience
Yes Yes
Windows Server Update Services
Yes Yes

Features

Windows Server Features installable with Server Manager (or PowerShell) Windows Server 2016 Standard Windows Server 2016 Datacenter
.NET Framework 3.5 Yes Yes
.NET Framework 4.6 Yes Yes
Background Intelligent Transfer Service (BITS) Yes Yes
BitLocker Drive Encryption Yes Yes
BitLocker Network Unlock Yes, when installed as Server with Desktop Experience Yes, when installed as Server with Desktop Experience
BranchCache Yes Yes
Client for NFS Yes Yes
Containers Yes (Windows containers unlimited; Hyper-V containers up to 2) Yes (all container types unlimited)
Data Center Bridging Yes Yes
Direct Play Yes, when installed as Server with Desktop Experience Yes, when installed as Server with Desktop Experience
Enhanced Storage Yes Yes
Failover Clustering Yes Yes
Group Policy Management Yes Yes
Host Guardian Hyper-V Support No Yes
I/O Quality of Service Yes Yes
IIS Hostable Web Core Yes Yes
Internet Printing Client Yes, when installed as Server with Desktop Experience Yes, when installed as Server with Desktop Experience
IPAM Server Yes Yes
iSNS Server service Yes Yes
LPR Port Monitor Yes, when installed as Server with Desktop Experience Yes, when installed as Server with Desktop Experience
Management OData IIS Extension Yes Yes
Media Foundation Yes Yes
Message Queueing Yes Yes
Multipath I/O Yes Yes
MultiPoint Connector Yes Yes
Network Load Balancing Yes Yes
Peer Name Resolution Protocol Yes Yes
Quality Windows Audio Video Experience Yes Yes
RAS Connection Manager Administration Kit Yes, when installed as Server with Desktop Experience Yes, when installed as Server with Desktop Experience
Remote Assistance Yes, when installed as Server with Desktop Experience Yes, when installed as Server with Desktop Experience
Remote Differential Compression Yes Yes
RSAT Yes Yes
RPC over HTTP Proxy Yes Yes
Setup and Boot Event Collection Yes Yes
Simple TCP/IP Services Yes, when installed as Server with Desktop Experience Yes, when installed as Server with Desktop Experience
SMB 1.0/CIFS File Sharing Support Installed Installed
SMB Bandwidth Limit Yes Yes
SMTP Server Yes Yes
SNMP Service Yes Yes
Software Load Balancer Yes Yes
Storage Replica No Yes
Telnet Client Yes Yes
TFTP Client Yes, when installed as Server with Desktop Experience Yes, when installed as Server with Desktop Experience
VM Shielding Tools for Fabric Management Yes Yes
WebDAV Redirector Yes Yes
Windows Biometric Framework Yes, when installed as Server with Desktop Experience Yes, when installed as Server with Desktop Experience
Windows Defender features Installed Installed
Windows Identity Foundation 3.5 Yes, when installed as Server with Desktop Experience Yes, when installed as Server with Desktop Experience
Windows Internal Database Yes Yes
Windows PowerShell Installed Installed
Windows Process Activation Service Yes Yes
Windows Search Service Yes, when installed as Server with Desktop Experience Yes, when installed as Server with Desktop Experience
Windows Server Backup Yes Yes
Windows Server Migration Tools Yes Yes
Windows Standards-Based Storage Management Yes Yes
Windows TIFF IFilter Yes, when installed as Server with Desktop Experience Yes, when installed as Server with Desktop Experience
WinRM IIS Extension Yes Yes
WINS Server Yes Yes
Wireless LAN Service Yes Yes
WoW64 support Installed Installed
XPS Viewer Yes, when installed as Server with Desktop Experience Yes, when installed as Server with Desktop Experience
Features available generally Windows Server 2016 Standard Windows Server 2016 Datacenter
Best Practices Analyzer Yes Yes
Direct Access Yes Yes
Dynamic Memory (in virtualization) Yes Yes
Hot Add/Replace RAM Yes Yes
Microsoft Management Console Yes Yes
Minimal Server Interface Yes Yes
Network Load Balancing Yes Yes
Windows PowerShell Yes Yes
Server Core installation option Yes Yes
Nano Server installation option Yes Yes
Server Manager Yes Yes
SMB Direct and SMB over RDMA Yes Yes
Software-defined Networking No Yes
Storage Management Service Yes Yes
Storage Spaces Yes Yes
Storage Spaces Direct No Yes
Volume Activation Services Yes Yes
VSS (Volume Shadow Copy Service) integration Yes Yes
Windows Server Update Services Yes Yes
Windows System Resource Manager Yes Yes
Server license logging Yes Yes
Inherited activation As guest if hosted on Datacenter Can be host or guest
Work folders Yes Yes