Showing posts with label Windows Server. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Windows Server. Show all posts

How to Install Windows Server 2008 - step by step

Windows Server 2008 is a closed source operating system released 4th February, 2008 based on Windows Vista. It has extended support until the 14th January 2020.It is available in both 32 and 64 bit versions but will be the last 32 bit Windows server operating system.









1 Pre-Installation


1 Insert the Windows 2008 Server installation disk into the computer.

 

2 Installation

 

1 Select your 'Language', 'Time and currency format' and your 'Keyboard or input type' then click next.

 

2 Click Install now.


3 Type in your product key, select whether you want to 'Automatically activate Windows when' and click Next.

  • There is a trial period of 60 days so if you can't find your product key, leave the field blank and click Next.

4 The 'Automatically activate Windows' is a personal preference but the box was checked for this tutorial.



5 If you have not entered a product key you will get this screen.

  • Press Yes to enter the product key now or No to activate it later.


6 Choose your edition of Windows Server 2008, check the 'I have selected the edition of Windows that I have purchased' box and click Next.

  • Server Core Installation is a text based version of Windows Server 2008 whilst the full edition is a graphical display.
  • You could be cheeky and choose a different version of Windows Server 2008 to the one you have bought but you will have to use a product key for that different version which will not be the same as the one you have bought.

7 Check the 'I accept the license terms' and click next.

  • It's a good idea to read the license agreement so you know what you're agreeing to.

8 Select the type of installation that you want.

  • Upgrade allows you to keep your files, settings etc before upgrading.
  • Custom (selected in this tutorial) does a clean install of Windows.

9 Choose where you want to install Windows and click Next.

 

10 The next part requires no input from the user.

  • The screen may flicker during this process. However, this is completely normal.

 

11 Restart your computer by click Restart Now or the computer will do it automatically.

12 Do not press anything here.      

       
  • Pressing anything here will result in you being put in a setup loop.
  • If you did press something and setup began again, restart the computer and you'll be fine.
 

13 Wait for windows to setup the computer.



14 Installation may hang here. 

 
Be patient and allow for a few minutes for the computer to continue with the installation.
  • If there is no disk activity (usually indicated by a flashing light on the computer) for several minutes, then restart the computer.

15 This step requires no input from the user but it might take some time.


16 Installation may hang here but be patient.

 

17 Press OK to continue.

 Pressing Cancel will do nothing.

 

18 Type in a password and then retype the same password underneath and click the arrow.

  • The password must contain numbers and a capital letter.
  • You must type in a password or else you cannot continue.

19 Click OK

20 The main installation is complete but this program can be used to configure settings for Windows.

  • Click the check box at the bottom if you do not want this to be displayed each time you start the computer.

21 This is the Server Manager which contains tools etc for your server.

  • Click the check box in the 'Computer Information' if you do not want this to be displayed at start up.

3 Shutting down


1 Click start.

 

2 Click this icon.

 Alternatively you can click the little arrow and then Shut Down.

 

3 You must type in a reason for the Shutdown that's at least one character or longer and then click OK.


How to Install Windows Server 2003 - step by step

Windows Server 2003 is an operating system designed for users who want to create a network that multiple computers can access. If you want to create a network, follow these instructions to install Windows Server 2003 on the computer you've selected to be your server machine.










Steps

 

 

Put the Windows Server 2003 CD into the CD drive and turn your computer on.


 If you can't open the CD drive while your computer is off, put the CD into the drive while the computer is on, and then restart your computer. This is so the computer loads from the CD to begin the installation process.


2  Wait as the Windows Setup screen loads. 

 
Hit the "Enter" button once the "Welcome to Setup" message appears. Read the Windows Licensing Agreement and hit the "F8" button to agree to the terms and continue to the next screen.


3  Create the partition on your hard drive where you will install Windows Server 2003. 

 
Highlight "Unpartitioned space" and hit the "C" key. Type in the amount of the drive you would like to partition. If you want to use the whole drive, type in the same number as shown next to "The maximum size for the new partition." Hit the "Enter" key, and then hit "Enter" again on the next screen to confirm your drive selection.


4  Use the arrow keys to highlight "Format the partition using the NTSF file system.

 
Hit the "Enter" key. Wait as the installer formats the drive. Then, wait as the installer copies the Windows Server 2003 files to your hard drive. A yellow progress bar will show you the progress of each of these processes.


5 Hit the "Enter" key to reboot your computer after the setup process completes. 

 
Wait as the installer loads device drivers for your computer. Click "Next" on the screen titled "Regional and Language Options."


6 Enter your name and organization on the next screen and click "Next.

 
Then, enter the product key that came with your CD and click "Next." Click the radio button next to "Per server" and enter the number of connections to your server that you will need. Click "Next."


7 Think of an administrator password and enter it on the next screen. 

Change the computer name. It's important if you want to host a website, SMTP server, POP3 server etc.. and click "Next." Select your time zone and click "Next."


8 Configure your network settings by clicking "Custom settings" on the screen titled "Network Settings" and clicking "Next.

 
Choose "Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)" and click "Properties." Choose either "Obtain an IP address automatically" if you don't know your IP address, or choose "Use the following IP address" and enter the IP address in the text box. Click "OK" and then click "Next."


9 Leave the "No" option selected on the "Workgroup or Computer Domain" page and click "Next.

 
Wait as the installation process continues installing; a message to the left of the screen will tell you how many minutes the remaining installation process will take. Your installation will be complete once the installer reboots your computer.

Windows Server Installation and Upgrade Step by Step Installation


Applies To: Windows Server 2016, Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows Server 2012


Is it time to move to a newer version of Windows Server? Depending on what you are running now, you have lots of options to get there.

Installation

If you want to move to a newer version of Windows Server on the same hardware, one way that always works is a clean installation, where you just install the newer operating system directly over the old one on the same hardware, thus deleting the previous operating system. That is the simplest way, but you will need to back up your data first and plan to reinstall your applications. There are a few things to be aware of, such as system requirements, so be sure to check the details for Windows Server 2016, Windows Server 2012 R2, and Windows Server 2012.
Moving from any pre-release version (such as Windows Server 2016 Technical Preview) to the released version (Windows Server 2016) always requires a clean installation.
Windows Server [migration] documentation helps you migrate one role or feature at a time from a source computer that is running Windows Server to another destination computer that is running Windows Server, either the same or a newer version. For these purposes, migration is defined as moving one role or feature and its data to a different computer, not upgrading the feature on the same computer. This is the recommended manner in which to move your existing workload and data to a more recent version of Windows Server. To get started, check the server role upgrade and migration matrix for Windows Server 2016.

Cluster OS Rolling Upgrade

Cluster OS Rolling Upgrade is a new feature in Windows Server 2016 that enables an administrator to upgrade the operating system of the cluster nodes from Windows Server 2012 R2 to Windows Server 2016 without stopping the Hyper-V or the Scale-Out File Server workloads. This feature allows you to avoid downtime which could impact Service Level Agreements. This new feature is discussed in more detail at Cluster operating system rolling upgrade.

License Conversion

In some operating system releases, you can convert a particular edition of the release to another edition of the same release in a single step with a simple command and the appropriate license key. This is called license conversion. For example, if your server is running Windows Server 2016 Standard, you can convert it to Windows Server 2016 Datacenter. In some releases of Windows Server, you can also freely convert among OEM, volume-licensed, and retail versions with the same command and the appropriate key.

Upgrade

If you want to keep the same hardware and all the server roles you have set up without flattening the server, upgrading is an option—and there are lots of ways to do it. In the classic upgrade, you go from an older operating system to a newer one, keeping your settings, server roles, and data intact. For example, if your server is running Windows Server 2012 R2, you can upgrade it to Windows Server 2016. However, not every older operating system has a pathway to every newer one.
Note
Upgrade works best in virtual machines where specific OEM hardware drivers are not needed for a successful upgrade.
You can upgrade from an evaluation version of the operating system to a retail version, from an older retail version to a newer version, or, in some cases, from a volume-licensed edition of the operating system to an ordinary retail edition.
Before you get started with an upgrade, have a look at the tables on this page to see how to get from where you are to where you want to be.
For information about the differences between the installation options available for Windows Server 2016 Technical Preview, including the features that are installed with each option and the management options available after installation, see Windows Server 2016.
Note
Whenever you migrate or upgrade to any version of Windows Server, you should review and understand the support lifecycle policy and timeframe for that version and plan accordingly. You can search for the lifecycle information for the particular Windows Server release that you are interested in.

Upgrading to Windows Server 2016

For details, including important caveats and limitations on upgrade, license conversion between editions of Windows Server 2016, and conversion of evaluation editions to retail, see Supported Upgrade Paths for Windows Server 2016.
Note
Note: Upgrades that switch from a Server Core installation to a Server with a Desktop installation (or vice versa) are not supported. If the older operating system you are upgrading or converting is a Server Core installation, the result will still be a Server Core installation of the newer operating system.
Quick reference table of supported upgrade paths from older Windows Server retail editions to Windows Server 2016 retail editions:
If you are running these versions and editions: You can upgrade to these versions and editions:
Windows Server 2012 Standard Windows Server 2016 Standard or Datacenter
Windows Server 2012 Datacenter Windows Server 2016 Datacenter
Windows Server 2012 R2 Standard Windows Server 2016 Standard or Datacenter
Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter Windows Server 2016 Datacenter
Hyper-V Server 2012 R2 Hyper-V Server 2016 (using Cluster OS Rolling Upgrade feature)
Windows Server 2012 R2 Essentials Windows Server 2016 Essentials
Windows Storage Server 2012 Standard Windows Storage Server 2016 Standard
Windows Storage Server 2012 Workgroup Windows Storage Server 2016 Workgroup
Windows Storage Server 2012 R2 Standard Windows Storage Server 2016 Standard
Windows Storage Server 2012 R2 Workgroup Windows Storage Server 2016 Workgroup

License conversion

You can convert Windows Server 2016 Standard (retail) to Windows Server 2016 Datacenter (retail).
You can convert Windows Server 2016 Essentials (retail) to Windows Server 2016 Standard (retail).
You can convert the evaluation version of Windows Server 2016 Standard to either Windows Server 2016 Standard (retail) or Datacenter (retail).
You can convert the evaluation version of Windows Server 2016 Datacenter to Windows Server 2016 Datacenter (retail).

Upgrading to Windows Server 2012 R2

For details, including important caveats and limitations on upgrade, license conversion between editions of Windows Server 2012 R2, and conversion of evaluation editions to retail, see Upgrade Options for Windows Server 2012 R2.
Quick reference table of supported upgrade paths from older Windows Server retail editions to Windows Server 2012 R2 retail editions:
If you are running: You can upgrade to these editions:
Windows Server 2008 R2 Datacenter with SP1 Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter
Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise with SP1 Windows Server 2012 R2 Standard or Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter
Windows Server 2008 R2 Standard with SP1 Windows Server 2012 R2 Standard or Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter
Windows Web Server 2008 R2 with SP1 Windows Server 2012 R2 Standard
Windows Server 2012 Datacenter Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter
Windows Server 2012 Standard Windows Server 2012 R2 Standard or Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter
Hyper-V Server 2012 Hyper-V Server 2012 R2

License conversion

You can convert Windows Server 2012 Standard (retail) to Windows Server 2012 Datacenter (retail).
You can convert Windows Server 2012 Essentials (retail) to Windows Server 2012 Standard (retail).
You can convert the evaluation version of Windows Server 2012 Standard to either Windows Server 2012 Standard (retail) or Datacenter (retail).

Upgrading to Windows Server 2012

For details, including important caveats and limitations on upgrade, and conversion of evaluation editions to retail, see Evaluation Versions and Upgrade Options for Windows Server 2012.
Quick reference table of supported upgrade paths from older Windows Server retail editions to Windows Server 2012 retail editions:
If you are running: You can upgrade to these editions:
Windows Server 2008 Standard with SP2 or Windows Server 2008 Enterprise with SP2 Windows Server 2012 Standard, Windows Server 2012 Datacenter
Windows Server 2008 Datacenter with SP2
Windows Web Server 2008 Windows Server 2012 Standard
Windows Server 2008 R2 Standard with SP1 or Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise with SP1 Windows Server 2012 Standard, Windows Server 2012 Datacenter
Windows Server 2008 R2 Datacenter with SP1 Windows Server 2012 Datacenter
Windows Web Server 2008 R2 Windows Server 2012 Standard

License conversion

You can convert Windows Server 2012 Standard (retail) to Windows Server 2012 Datacenter (retail).
You can convert Windows Server 2012 Essentials (retail) to Windows Server 2012 Standard (retail).
You can convert the evaluation version of Windows Server 2012 Standard to either Windows Server 2012 Standard (retail) or Datacenter (retail).

Upgrading to Windows Server 2008 R2

For details, including important caveats and limitations, see Windows Server 2008 R2 Upgrade Paths.
Quick reference table of supported upgrade paths from older Windows Server retail editions to Windows Server 2008 R2 retail editions:
From Windows Server 2003 (SP2, R2) Upgrade to Windows Server 2008 R2
Datacenter Datacenter
Enterprise Enterprise, Datacenter
Standard Standard, Enterprise
From Windows Server 2008 (RTM-SP1, SP2) Upgrade to Windows Server 2008 R2
Datacenter Datacenter
Enterprise Enterprise, Datacenter
Foundation (SP2 only) Standard
Standard Standard, Enterprise
Web Standard, Web
From Windows Server 2008 (RC, IDS, RTM) Upgrade to Windows Server 2008 R2
Datacenter Datacenter
Enterprise Enterprise or Datacenter
Foundation Standard or Foundation
Standard Standard or Enterprise
Web Standard or Web

Windows Server Installation and Upgrade - Step by Step

Is it time to move to a newer version of Windows Server? Depending on what you are running now, you have lots of options to get there.

Installation

If you want to move to a newer version of Windows Server on the same hardware, one way that always works is a clean installation, where you just install the newer operating system directly over the old one on the same hardware, thus deleting the previous operating system. That is the simplest way, but you will need to back up your data first and plan to reinstall your applications. There are a few things to be aware of, such as system requirements, so be sure to check the details for Windows Server 2016, Windows Server 2012 R2, and Windows Server 2012.
Moving from any pre-release version (such as Windows Server 2016 Technical Preview) to the released version (Windows Server 2016) always requires a clean installation.
Windows Server [migration] documentation helps you migrate one role or feature at a time from a source computer that is running Windows Server to another destination computer that is running Windows Server, either the same or a newer version. For these purposes, migration is defined as moving one role or feature and its data to a different computer, not upgrading the feature on the same computer. This is the recommended manner in which to move your existing workload and data to a more recent version of Windows Server. To get started, check the server role upgrade and migration matrix for Windows Server 2016.

Cluster OS Rolling Upgrade

Cluster OS Rolling Upgrade is a new feature in Windows Server 2016 that enables an administrator to upgrade the operating system of the cluster nodes from Windows Server 2012 R2 to Windows Server 2016 without stopping the Hyper-V or the Scale-Out File Server workloads. This feature allows you to avoid downtime which could impact Service Level Agreements. This new feature is discussed in more detail at Cluster operating system rolling upgrade.

License Conversion

In some operating system releases, you can convert a particular edition of the release to another edition of the same release in a single step with a simple command and the appropriate license key. This is called license conversion. For example, if your server is running Windows Server 2016 Standard, you can convert it to Windows Server 2016 Datacenter. In some releases of Windows Server, you can also freely convert among OEM, volume-licensed, and retail versions with the same command and the appropriate key.

Upgrade

If you want to keep the same hardware and all the server roles you have set up without flattening the server, upgrading is an option—and there are lots of ways to do it. In the classic upgrade, you go from an older operating system to a newer one, keeping your settings, server roles, and data intact. For example, if your server is running Windows Server 2012 R2, you can upgrade it to Windows Server 2016. However, not every older operating system has a pathway to every newer one.
Note
Upgrade works best in virtual machines where specific OEM hardware drivers are not needed for a successful upgrade.
You can upgrade from an evaluation version of the operating system to a retail version, from an older retail version to a newer version, or, in some cases, from a volume-licensed edition of the operating system to an ordinary retail edition.
Before you get started with an upgrade, have a look at the tables on this page to see how to get from where you are to where you want to be.
For information about the differences between the installation options available for Windows Server 2016 Technical Preview, including the features that are installed with each option and the management options available after installation, see Windows Server 2016.
Note
Whenever you migrate or upgrade to any version of Windows Server, you should review and understand the support lifecycle policy and timeframe for that version and plan accordingly. You can search for the lifecycle information for the particular Windows Server release that you are interested in.

Upgrading to Windows Server 2016

For details, including important caveats and limitations on upgrade, license conversion between editions of Windows Server 2016, and conversion of evaluation editions to retail, see Supported Upgrade Paths for Windows Server 2016.
Note
Note: Upgrades that switch from a Server Core installation to a Server with a Desktop installation (or vice versa) are not supported. If the older operating system you are upgrading or converting is a Server Core installation, the result will still be a Server Core installation of the newer operating system.
Quick reference table of supported upgrade paths from older Windows Server retail editions to Windows Server 2016 retail editions:
If you are running these versions and editions: You can upgrade to these versions and editions:
Windows Server 2012 Standard Windows Server 2016 Standard or Datacenter
Windows Server 2012 Datacenter Windows Server 2016 Datacenter
Windows Server 2012 R2 Standard Windows Server 2016 Standard or Datacenter
Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter Windows Server 2016 Datacenter
Hyper-V Server 2012 R2 Hyper-V Server 2016 (using Cluster OS Rolling Upgrade feature)
Windows Server 2012 R2 Essentials Windows Server 2016 Essentials
Windows Storage Server 2012 Standard Windows Storage Server 2016 Standard
Windows Storage Server 2012 Workgroup Windows Storage Server 2016 Workgroup
Windows Storage Server 2012 R2 Standard Windows Storage Server 2016 Standard
Windows Storage Server 2012 R2 Workgroup Windows Storage Server 2016 Workgroup

License conversion

You can convert Windows Server 2016 Standard (retail) to Windows Server 2016 Datacenter (retail).
You can convert Windows Server 2016 Essentials (retail) to Windows Server 2016 Standard (retail).
You can convert the evaluation version of Windows Server 2016 Standard to either Windows Server 2016 Standard (retail) or Datacenter (retail).
You can convert the evaluation version of Windows Server 2016 Datacenter to Windows Server 2016 Datacenter (retail).

Upgrading to Windows Server 2012 R2

For details, including important caveats and limitations on upgrade, license conversion between editions of Windows Server 2012 R2, and conversion of evaluation editions to retail, see Upgrade Options for Windows Server 2012 R2.
Quick reference table of supported upgrade paths from older Windows Server retail editions to Windows Server 2012 R2 retail editions:
If you are running: You can upgrade to these editions:
Windows Server 2008 R2 Datacenter with SP1 Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter
Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise with SP1 Windows Server 2012 R2 Standard or Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter
Windows Server 2008 R2 Standard with SP1 Windows Server 2012 R2 Standard or Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter
Windows Web Server 2008 R2 with SP1 Windows Server 2012 R2 Standard
Windows Server 2012 Datacenter Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter
Windows Server 2012 Standard Windows Server 2012 R2 Standard or Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter
Hyper-V Server 2012 Hyper-V Server 2012 R2

License conversion

You can convert Windows Server 2012 Standard (retail) to Windows Server 2012 Datacenter (retail).
You can convert Windows Server 2012 Essentials (retail) to Windows Server 2012 Standard (retail).
You can convert the evaluation version of Windows Server 2012 Standard to either Windows Server 2012 Standard (retail) or Datacenter (retail).

Upgrading to Windows Server 2012

For details, including important caveats and limitations on upgrade, and conversion of evaluation editions to retail, see Evaluation Versions and Upgrade Options for Windows Server 2012.
Quick reference table of supported upgrade paths from older Windows Server retail editions to Windows Server 2012 retail editions:
If you are running: You can upgrade to these editions:
Windows Server 2008 Standard with SP2 or Windows Server 2008 Enterprise with SP2 Windows Server 2012 Standard, Windows Server 2012 Datacenter
Windows Server 2008 Datacenter with SP2
Windows Web Server 2008 Windows Server 2012 Standard
Windows Server 2008 R2 Standard with SP1 or Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise with SP1 Windows Server 2012 Standard, Windows Server 2012 Datacenter
Windows Server 2008 R2 Datacenter with SP1 Windows Server 2012 Datacenter
Windows Web Server 2008 R2 Windows Server 2012 Standard

License conversion

You can convert Windows Server 2012 Standard (retail) to Windows Server 2012 Datacenter (retail).
You can convert Windows Server 2012 Essentials (retail) to Windows Server 2012 Standard (retail).
You can convert the evaluation version of Windows Server 2012 Standard to either Windows Server 2012 Standard (retail) or Datacenter (retail).

Upgrading to Windows Server 2008 R2

For details, including important caveats and limitations, see Windows Server 2008 R2 Upgrade Paths.
Quick reference table of supported upgrade paths from older Windows Server retail editions to Windows Server 2008 R2 retail editions:
From Windows Server 2003 (SP2, R2) Upgrade to Windows Server 2008 R2
Datacenter Datacenter
Enterprise Enterprise, Datacenter
Standard Standard, Enterprise
From Windows Server 2008 (RTM-SP1, SP2) Upgrade to Windows Server 2008 R2
Datacenter Datacenter
Enterprise Enterprise, Datacenter
Foundation (SP2 only) Standard
Standard Standard, Enterprise
Web Standard, Web
From Windows Server 2008 (RC, IDS, RTM) Upgrade to Windows Server 2008 R2
Datacenter Datacenter
Enterprise Enterprise or Datacenter
Foundation Standard or Foundation
Standard Standard or Enterprise
Web Standard or Web

Migrating Roles and Features in Windows Server - Step by Step

This page contains links to information and tools that help guide you through the process of migrating roles and features to Windows Server 2016, Windows Server 2012 R2, and Windows Server 2012. Many roles and features can be migrated by using Windows Server Migration Tools, a set of five Windows PowerShell cmdlets that was introduced in Windows Server 2008 R2 for easily migrating role and feature elements and data.
The migration guides support migrations of specified roles and features from one server to another (not in-place upgrades). Unless otherwise noted in the guides, migrations are supported between physical and virtual computers, and between full installation options of Windows Server and servers that are running the Server Core installation option.

Before you begin

Before you begin migrating roles and features, verify that both source and destination servers are running the most current service packs that are available for their operating systems. An e-book of Windows Server 2012 R2 and Windows Server 2012 migration guides is now available. For more information, and to download the e-book, see the E-Book Gallery for Microsoft Technologies. Windows Server Migration Guides are also available as part of the PDF download, Windows Server 2012 R2 and Windows Server 2012 TechNet Library Documentation, available on the Microsoft Download Center.
Note
Whenever you migrate or upgrade to any version of Windows Server, you should review and understand the support lifecycle policy and timeframe for that version and plan accordingly. You can search for the lifecycle information for the particular Windows Server release that you are interested in.

Windows Server 2016

Migration Guides

Updated migration guides for Windows Server 2016 are under development. Check back at this location for updates as they become available. In many cases, the steps in the Windows Server 2012 R2 migration guides are still relevant for Windows Server 2016.
  • Remote Desktop Services
  • Web Server (IIS)
  • Windows Server Update Services
  • MultiPoint Services

Windows Server 2012 R2

Migration Guides

Follow the steps in these guides to migrate roles and features from servers that are running Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Server 2012, or Windows Server 2012 R2 to Windows Server 2012 R2. Windows Server Migration Tools in Windows Server 2012 R2 supports cross-subnet migrations.
  • Install, Use, and Remove Windows Server Migration Tools
  • Active Directory Certificate Services Migration Guide for Windows Server 2012 R2
  • Migrating Active Directory Federation Services Role Service to Windows Server 2012 R2
  • Active Directory Rights Management Services Migration and Upgrade Guide
  • Migrate File and Storage Services to Windows Server 2012 R2
  • Migrate Hyper-V to Windows Server 2012 R2 from Windows Server 2012
  • Migrate Network Policy Server to Windows Server 2012
  • Migrate Remote Desktop Services to Windows Server 2012 R2
  • Migrate Windows Server Update Services to Windows Server 2012 R2
  • Migrate Cluster Roles to Windows Server 2012 R2
  • Migrate DHCP Server to Windows Server 2012 R2

Windows Server 2012

Migration Guides

Follow the steps in these guides to migrate roles and features from servers that are running Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2008 R2, or Windows Server 2012 to Windows Server 2012. Windows Server Migration Tools in Windows Server 2012 supports cross-subnet migrations.
  • Install, Use, and Remove Windows Server Migration Tools
  • Migrate Active Directory Federation Services Role Services to Windows Server 2012
  • Migrate Health Registration Authority to Windows Server 2012
  • Migrate Hyper-V to Windows Server 2012 from Windows Server 2008 R2
  • Migrate IP Configuration to Windows Server 2012
  • Migrate Network Policy Server to Windows Server 2012
  • Migrate Print and Document Services to Windows Server 2012
  • Migrate Remote Access to Windows Server 2012
  • Migrate Windows Server Update Services to Windows Server 2012
  • Upgrade Active Directory Domain Controllers to Windows Server 2012
  • Migrating Clustered Services and Applications to Windows Server 2012

Windows Server 2008 R2

Migration Guides

Follow the steps in these guides to migrate roles and features from servers that are running Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2008, or Windows Server 2008 R2 to Windows Server 2008 R2. Windows Server Migration Tools in Windows Server 2008 R2 does not support cross-subnet migrations.
  • Windows Server Migration Tools Installation, Access, and Removal
  • Active Directory Certificate Services Migration Guide
  • Active Directory Domain Services and Domain Name System (DNS) Server Migration Guide
  • BranchCache Migration Guide
  • Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) Server Migration Guide
  • File Services Migration Guide
  • HRA Migration Guide
  • Hyper-V Migration Guide
  • IP Configuration Migration Guide
  • Local User and Group Migration Guide
  • NPS Migration Guide
  • Print Services Migration Guide
  • Remote Desktop Services Migration Guide
  • RRAS Migration Guide
  • Windows Server Migration Common Tasks and Information
  • Windows Server Update Services 3.0 SP2 Migration Guide

Windows Server 2016 System Requirements - Step by Step


System Requirements

This topic addresses the minimum system requirements to run Windows Server® 2016.
Note
In this release, clean installations are recommended.
Note
If at the time of installation, you choose to install with the Server Core option, you should be aware that no GUI components are installed at all and you will not be able to install or uninstall them with Server Manager. If you need GUI features, be sure to choose the "Server with Desktop Experience" option when you install Windows Server 2016. For more information, see Install Nano Server

Review system requirements

The following are estimated system requirements Windows Server 2016. If your computer has less than the "minimum" requirements, you will not be able to install this product correctly. Actual requirements will vary based on your system configuration and the applications and features you install.
Unless otherwise specified, these minimum system requirements apply to all installation options (Server Core, Server with Desktop Experience, and Nano Server) and both Standard and Datacenter editions.
Important
The highly diverse scope of potential deployments makes it unrealistic to state "recommended" system requirements that would be generally applicable. Consult documentation for each of the server roles you intend to deploy for more details about the resource needs of particular server roles. For the best results, conduct test deployments to determine appropriate system requirements for your particular deployment scenarios.

Processor

Processor performance depends not only on the clock frequency of the processor, but also on the number of processor cores and the size of the processor cache. The following are the processor requirements for this product:
Minimum:
  • 1.4 GHz 64-bit processor
  • Compatible with x64 instruction set
  • Supports NX and DEP
  • Supports CMPXCHG16b, LAHF/SAHF, and PrefetchW
  • Supports Second Level Address Translation (EPT or NPT)
Coreinfo is a tool you can use to confirm which of these capabilities you CPU has.

RAM

The following are the estimated RAM requirements for this product:
Minimum:
  • 512 MB (2 GB for Server with Desktop Experience installation option)
  • ECC (Error Correcting Code) type or similar technology
Important
If you create a virtual machine with the minimum supported hardware parameters (1 processor core and 512 MB RAM) and then attempt to install this release on the virtual machine, Setup will fail.
To avoid this, do one of the following:
  • Allocate more than 800 MB RAM to the virtual machine you intend to install this release on. Once Setup has completed, you can change the allocation to as little as 512 MB RAM, depending on the actual server configuration.
  • Interrupt the boot process of this release on the virtual machine with SHIFT+F10. In the command prompt that opens, use Diskpart.exe to create and format an installation partition. Run Wpeutil createpagefile /path=C:\pf.sys (assuming the installation partition you created was C:). Close the command prompt and proceed with Setup.

Storage controller and disk space requirements

Computers that run Windows Server 2016 must include a storage adapter that is compliant with the PCI Express architecture specification. Persistent storage devices on servers classified as hard disk drives must not be PATA. Windows Server 2016 does not allow ATA/PATA/IDE/EIDE for boot, page, or data drives.
The following are the estimated minimum disk space requirements for the system partition.
Minimum: 32 GB
Note
Be aware that 32 GB should be considered an absolute minimum value for successful installation. This minimum should allow you to install Windows Server 2016 in Server Core mode, with the Web Services (IIS) server role. A server in Server Core mode is about 4 GB smaller than the same server in Server with a GUI mode.
The system partition will need extra space for any of the following circumstances:
  • If you install the system over a network.
  • Computers with more than 16 GB of RAM will require more disk space for paging, hibernation, and dump files.

Network adapter requirements

Network adapters used with this release should include these features:
Minimum:
  • An Ethernet adapter capable of at least gigabit throughput
  • Compliant with the PCI Express architecture specification.
  • Supports Pre-boot Execution Environment (PXE).
A network adapter that supports network debugging (KDNet) is useful, but not a minimum requirement.

Other requirements

Computers running this release also must have the following:
  • DVD drive (if you intend to install the operating system from DVD media)
The following items are not strictly required, but are necessary for certain features:
  • UEFI 2.3.1c-based system and firmware that supports secure boot
  • Trusted Platform Module
  • Graphics device and monitor capable of Super VGA (1024 x 768) or higher-resolution
  • Keyboard and Microsoft® mouse (or other compatible pointing device)
  • Internet access (fees may apply)
Note
A Trusted Platform Module (TPM) chip is not strictly required to install this release, though it is necessary in order to use certain features such as BitLocker Drive Encryption. If your computer uses TPM, it must meet these requirements:
  • Hardware-based TPMs must implement version 2.0 of the TPM specification.
  • TPMs that implement version 2.0 must have an EK certificate that is >either pre-provisioned to the TPM by the hardware vendor or be capable of >being retrieved by the device during the first boot.
  • TPMs that implement version 2.0 must ship with SHA-256 PCR banks and >implement PCRs 0 through 23 for SHA-256. It is acceptable to ship TPMs >with a single switchable PCR bank that can be used for both SHA-1 and >SHA-256 measurements.
  • A UEFI option to turn off the TPM is not a requirement.

Step by Step: Important Issues in Windows Server 2016

These release notes summarize the most critical issues in the Windows Server® 2016 operating system, including ways to avoid or work around the issues, if known. For information about by-design changes, new features, and fixes in this release, see What's New in Windows Server 2016 and announcements from the specific feature teams. Unless otherwise specified, each reported issue applies to all editions and installation options of Windows Server 2016.
This document is continuously updated. As critical issues requiring a workaround are discovered, they are added, as are new workarounds and fixes as they become available.

Server Core installation option

When you install Windows Server 2016 by using the Server Core installation option, the print spooler is installed and starts by default even when the Print Server role is not installed.
To avoid this, after the first boot, set the print spooler to disabled.

Containers

  • Before you use containers, install Servicing stack update for Windows 10 Version 1607: August 23, 2016 or any later updates that are available. Otherwise, a number of problems can occur, including failures in building, starting, or running containers, and errors similar to "CreateProcess failed in Win32: The RPC server is unavailable."
  • The NanoServerPackage OneGet provider does not work in Windows Containers. To work around this, use Find-NanoServerPackage and Save-NanoServerPackage on a different computer (not a container) to download the needed package. Then copy the packages into the container and install them.

Device Guard

If you use virtualization-based protection of code integrity or Shielded virtual machines (that use virtualization-based protection of code integrity), you should be aware that these technologies could be incompatible with some devices and applications. You should test such configurations in your lab before enabling the features on production systems. Failure to do so could result in unexpected data loss or stop errors.

Microsoft Exchange

If you attempt to run Microsoft Exchange 2016 CU3 on Windows Server 2016, you will experience errors in the IIS host process W3WP.exe. There is no workaround at this time. You should postpone deployment of Exchange 2016 CU3 on Windows Server 2016 until a supported fix is available.

Remote Server Administration Tools (RSAT)

If you are running a version of Windows 10 older than the Anniversary Update, and are using Hyper-V and virtual machines with an enabled virtual Trusted Platform Module (including shielded virtual machines), and then install the version of RSAT provided for Windows Server 2016, attempts to start those virtual machines will fail.
To avoid this, upgrade the client computer to Windows 10 Anniversary Update (or later) prior to installing RSAT. If this has already occurred, uninstall RSAT, upgrade the client to Window 10 Anniversary Update, and then reinstall RSAT.

Shielded virtual machines

  • Ensure that you have installed all available updates before you deploy Shielded virtual machines in production.
  • If you use virtualization-based protection of code integrity or Shielded virtual machines (that use virtualization-based protection of code integrity), you should be aware that these technologies could be incompatible with some devices and applications. You should test such configurations in your lab before enabling the features on production systems. Failure to do so could result in unexpected data loss or stop errors.

Start menu

This issue affects Windows Server 2016 installed with the Server with Desktop Experience option.
If you install any applications which add shortcut items inside a folder on the Start menu, the shortcuts will not work until you log out and log back in again.
Go back to the main Windows Server 2016 hub.
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